If you were to name a few exercises that those in senior living are most suited, it’s almost certain that boxing would not feature highly on your list.

After all, a sport which involves repeated, calculated strikes to the body and head can hardly be considered an advisable exercise for those looking improve their sense of active living. Or can it?

Aren’t I too old to start boxing?

A resounding ‘no!’ Boxing isn’t all about fighting – though this sounds preposterous, hear us out! By learning to box, you’ll be taking part in the various workouts and meeting a selection of like-minded people, meaning that you can open up a new window of opportunity that could take you on a path you’ve never even comprehended before.

You never once have to step in the ring with someone looking to knock your block off, if at all – it’s entirely up you. The beauty of learning to box isn’t understanding how to fight – it’s how fit and healthy you can become through the sport’s training methods.

According to Health Direct Australia, older adults, aged 65 and above, should aim for 2.5 hours of moderate intensity aerobic activity each week. Though this may initially seem quite a lot, when broken down, it equates to five 30 minute blocks, five days a week, with the remaining two used for rest.

However, the Australian Bureau of Statistics states that 56.9 per cent of people aged over 75 do precisely zero exercise, and 25.8 per cent partake in very little.

The beauty of learning to box isn’t understanding how to fight – it’s how fit and healthy you can become through the sport’s training methods.

So is boxing really a viable alternative to jogging, swimming and dancing? To the more adventurously-minded, it just may be. Here’s why:

Give your heart (and other organs) a helping hand 

Whether you are gently shadow boxing, getting busy with the heavy bag or simply enjoying the myriad of exercises that are part of boxing’s repertoire, your heart will enjoy the full benefits of a great workout.

The heart and lungs are made to work that little bit harder, which can seriously improve cardiovascular function. Oxygen, owing to greater blood circulation, will also be pumped more efficiently around the body, lending the body’s other organs a timely boost.

Stave off stress

Aside from the many physical benefits that boxing can bring, it can also be of surprising mental value. This is particularly true when it comes to busting stress, as hitting an inanimate object – which, in a boxing gym, there are plenty – can really help you let off steam!

When you’re done with boxing for the day, you’ll emerge relaxed, confident and ready to take on the world, no matter your age!

How boxing can improve the overall health in those over-55